Joining God in Palm Harbor and the World.

Summer Film Fest!

It’s the second annual Summer Film Fest! Replacing Bible study for the summer, 9 films worth discussing will be presented between June 6 and August 15. You’ll find some movies you’ve seen before, some you always wanted to see, and maybe a few you’ve never heard of. The series includes many blockbusters, Oscar winners and lots of well-known actors. So, every Wednesday (except July 4th, July 25th), pack yourself a snack and a drink, and head over to the LCR library for some great movies and stimulating discussion! Maryann Sheppard, your hostess for the series, suggests you arrive early so everyone’s all set promptly at 10 when the action starts!

June 6: Under the Lighthouse Dancing (94 minutes) Six friends set out for a fun weekend, but it takes a different turn when one of the participants reveals devastating news.  Then the race is on to create a miracle.  This movie is pure magic you will long remember.  It is breath-taking visual poetry.

 

 

June 13: My Name is Khan (161 minutes) This is a long movie, but well worth it.  It is about a man from India (Khan)who has a unique way of seeing the world.  He moves to San Francisco, falls in love, but fate and tragedy tear the pair apart. Then Kahn embarks on a remarkable journey across America to win back the love of his life.

 

June 20: Das Boot (The Boat) (141 minutes) This movie is about a German submarine manned by new recruits near the end of WWII – when most of the subs never made it back to port.  We usually see the American side of the war, but this shows us the German side.  It has been called “one of the best movies ever made.”  I concur. (It stars Juergen Prochnow who we saw last year in “The Lost Honor of Katarina Blum.”)

 

 

June 27: The Magic of Ordinary Days (98 minutes) This Hallmark production stars Keri Russell and Skeet Ulrich in this movie about a girl with big plans for her life.  Life has other plans for her, however, and her perfect life falls apart.  She finds herself on a remote farm married to a man she hardly knows.  While the husband hopes she can fill the hole in his heart left by his brother killed in the war, the wife just wants to get out of there.  It will take faith, forgiveness and a miracle to work this out.

 

July 11: The Amish:  A People of Preservation (54 minutes) This is a PBS special documented by Mennonite historian John Ruth, and Dr. John A.Hostetler, author of Amish Society.  It deals with Amish religious beliefs and changes which are now occurring in that society, focusing on how they are careful not to sacrifice spiritual covenant and community for the sake of convenience.

 

July 18: Inherit the Wind (128 minutes) This is an old movie (1960) staring Spencer Tracy, Fredric March and Gene Kelly (no dancing here!)   It is about the controversial subject of evolution versus creation.  Tracy plays the attorney up against a fundamentalist leader(March) in rural Tennessee where a teacher is brought to trial for teaching Darwinism.  This is the most titanic courtroom battle of the 20th century, garnering 4 Oscar nominations.

 

Aug. 1: Don Juan de Marco (97 minutes)  Staring Marlon Brando, Faye Dunaway and Johnny Depp, this is the story of a man(Depp) who thought he was the greatest lover in the world…and the people who tried to cure him of it.  With a cast like this, how can one go wrong?  This movie is a joy to savor with some good life lessons along the way.  It will make your day a happy one.

 

Aug. 8: Joyeux Noel (116 minutes) This movie was nominated for an Oscar, a British Oscar (BAFTA) and Golden Globe for Best Foreign Film.  It is the true-life story of the spontaneous 1914 Christmas Eve truce declared by Scottish, French and German troops in the trenches of WWI.  Amazingly, enemies leave weapons behind and band together as brothers in the middle of the war.

 

Aug. 15: A Beautiful Mind (135 minutes) Winner of 4 Oscars. Russell Crow, Ed Harris, and Jennifer Connelly star in this true story of John Nash, winner of the Nobel Prize for economics.  Nash is brilliant in math, but has zero in the way of social skills.  He manages to fall in love, but also falls into madness.  This is a story of tremendous love and courage shining through situations that go way beyond what a “normal” life entails. (And the music by James Horner (who also wrote the music for Titanic) is pure magic.)